Friday, December 14, 2018

Gardner's Beacon, Vol VIII, No 2

This issue of Gardner's Beacon reviews the activities and accomplishments for the year as well as current and future research interests. The 400th of Plymouth is coming up in 2020. Cape Ann wouldn't be far behind.

In terms of activities, this year, we learned more about Margaret Friar. The discussion was supported by her profile on WikiTree. We know her parents, when they got married, when she was baptized, her father's will, and notice of the marriage to Thomas.

We completed a WikiTree profile for Dr. Frank, including his mother's line as delineated in his own handwriting. We found out that Dr. Frank is a descendant of both Margaret and Damaris.

During the year, we did another print of The Gardner Annals. This issue includes Vol. III and IV. We  summarize the contents of this recent print. Also, we now have a set of two prints (I&II and III&IV) available for purchase. Contact us at publications@TGSoc.org for ordering instructions.

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See Vol. VIII, No. 2 of Gardner's Beacon for a review of research to date and more. Sources.

Remarks: Modified: 12/14/2018

12/14/2018 --

Friday, December 7, 2018

DNA in use

Yes, we have an interest in this, from a technology sense. I am talking both the biology (including anthropology et al) specifics as well the mathematics and computing (these last two are my special interest): DNA and genealogyAdmissibility.

This fall, there was discussion that came out of Massachusetts that was interesting. I saw some discussion on Quora and have put it here as a place-holder.
Let me just say this. We see collective abilities that have power, as in those related to names (families) or regions. We see categorization, as well. And, there is analytic power as we have seen with forensics. However, consider this. It is noted that our DNA differs by not much than that of some closer primates. Which suggests? We are not digging deep enough. That'll come.

After all, the work at describing the genetic material is still relatively new. And, we know what that technology was all about.

Too, I can show cases where doing this analysis did not help. Of course, one might argue that a full coverage of all people would be fairly strong. I am not so sure. Remember, all of this is either computational or is computationally driven. That whole realm, which is at the crux of our lives and growing in influence, is poorly understood despite all of the silly valley demonstrations of their prowess. Have you looked at the messes that those folks have us into now? Which may have been there before but are now several orders of magnitude more complicated?

Remarks: Modified: 12/08/2018

12/07/2018 --

Descendants of Thomas and Margaret

From the beginning, we have thought of the offspring over the generations. The first post listed the kids with some commentary. This would have been a year after the initial exposure to this whole subject matter. One half of that year was spent spinning wheels in ancestry (following the shaking leaves to perdition). In January of 2010, I talked to my first genealogist courtesy of D.A.R. who told me to avoid ancestry (dot com) as much as possible.

I, then, went and created my own style and format and got to work. Most of the stuff picked up from ancestry was not good. One resource that I did like was rootsweb (later bought by ancestry (dot com) especially when the researcher had sources). It was absent a year ago and came back slowly this year. I mean slowly. It seems to have perked up of late. Some of the links might be stale (we'll be looking for those).
  • Persons in the books (fall 2009) - I wrote up the lists in 2009 having both books in hand. It was in a handwritten form and put at our site later. The two books covered part of the descendants of Samuel and of George. What of the rest of the kids? 
  • The kids (26 Sep 2010) - This list comes from Dr. Frank's 1907 book. At the time, I had not heard of the NEHGS Great Migration Project. That was to come shortly. 
  • Two generations (28 Oct 2010) - Notice that for most of the kids, only a few of their children had been studied, to this point. Those ones were bolded with larger letters. For instance, Samuel (#6) and Abel? That is Dr. Frank's line. George (#3) and Samuel? That is the line of the Memorial book (1933).  
  • The progeny (9 Nov 2010) - So, I started to do a list of descendants. This forced us to fill in the line. At the same time, there was a list put on the Wikipedia page for Thomas. 
  • More progeny (6 Dec 2010) - By this time, finally, I found the 1933 book, on-line. There are several copies (different scans) which is nice. 
Incidentally, I need to mention that neither of Dr. Frank's books are considered as reliable due to them being self-published. So, we have our work cut out. I have already verified Dr. Frank's line. It can be seen at WikiTree. I have been down the Gardner lines as they were used for applications to Heritage Societies. We just got his mother's line this past summer.

This is the descendant's page for Thomas: Gardner-Descendants-159. Looks like Richard and John have had the most attention which is good. I heard, early on, of a pending Richard book (what happened?). This Thomas node is owned by the NEHGS project, Great Migration. As you descend the tree, there are other owners. One can edit using the normal courtesy. And, bringing sources to the table is always welcomed. 

Remarks: Modified: 12/07/2018

12/07/2018 --

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Wikipedia, Rev. John White et al

On Wikipedia, John White (Reverend) has moved to John White (colonist priest). Just now, fixed the redirection to the particular page, rather than have it go to the page listing all of the John Whites.

One nice reference to this page is from capecodtoday.com in their article on Cape Ann which references the Thomas Gardner (planter) page. This page was originally posted in 2010 but has been updated.

On the Thomas Gardner page, I have been changing sources to meet the Wikipedia requirements. Once that is done, we can remove the warning which is a distraction. See the Talk page for comments with regard to updates that have been done and are pending.

Remember, Wikipedia edits are open to whomever want to help in this matter. The page for Thomas Gardner (planter) was created on 10 January of 2010. Of the 366 edits, 279 are mine. From the Thomas page, there several auxiliary pages that need attention. I will list these at some point. As we have, Wikipedia, Wikitree, and the blogs plus the two websites to keep current.

Example page: Great House (Cape Ann). After hearing from John Goff, I researched this a little more. This is the house that John Endicott had moved to Salem. Thomas and Margaret enjoyed it after most went over to Naumkeag.

Much to do. The 400th looms.

Remarks: Modified: 12/04/2018

12/04/2018 --