Monday, December 2, 2019

Gardner River

This river flows into the Yellowstone River near Gardiner, MT. As such, these waters flow into the Missouri River and then the Mississippi. Yes, that is a long waterway. Lewis & Clark went back up the other way. Post that, more people went west. One of them was Johnson Gardner for whom the River and the area were named.

Gardiner, MT 
Gardner River: Starts in Yellowstone Park, at 10K feet, flows 25 miles, but has a 202 sq mile basin.

Johnson Gardner was a cohort of Jedediah Strong Smith, Hugh Glass (read about The Revenant), and others. We are researching families related to these folks.

We started by looking for places with Gardner in the name (and will look at other associations): Gardner, KS, Gardner, CO, Gardiners Island, Gardiner, OR, and others. We'll pull these together some time. The idea is that we might be seeing the 400th recognized; however, the 200th covers a whole lot more territory in more ways that one.

On look further at Johnson Gardner, we find out that he is out of Virginia. We will be looking further at that.  But, we want to consider the New England influence as we see via all of those names that come out of the area (starting with Cape Ann) and are found in the huge western expanse.

Here's a quick example which will be written further in its own post. Not far from where Gardner River starts, there is a change due to the Continental Divide. And, we find Conant Creek (Wyoming - known as Berry Creek) that flows into the Snake River (History of the Teton area). There's another Conant Creek in Idaho that flows into the Boise River that flow into the Snake River.

This water goes to the Pacific. The namesake of one of the Creeks arrived in the area in the latter part of the 1800s. We will look further at the family history.

Roger Conant is a gpp of Dr. Frank.

Further reading: Human influences on the Northern Yellowstone Range, ...

Remarks: Modified: 12/03/2019 

12/02/2019 --

Saturday, November 30, 2019

Joseph Gardner

Joseph (WikiTree) was the youngest son. He was born in New England.

Joseph married Ann Downing who was the niece of John Winthrop. They did not have children.

Joseph was a lawyer as was his wife. Joseph was killed in the King Philip War. Ann married Simon Bradstreet. She drew up a pre-nup for him prior to their marriage.
  • King Philip, Joseph and Ann - John Goff looks at the time of the war. 
  • Aunts, uncles, cousins - we will take a special effort to remember this couple. 
  • Gardner's Beacon, Vol. II, No 1. - featured this couple and their house which was given to them by Ann's mother. They lived there for years. After Joseph died and Ann remarried, the house was known as the Bradstreet house. It was Ann's house. She left it to a nephew, son of her brother-in-law (Samuel, line of Dr. Frank). 
  • Houses, again - we have done several posts on houses. This one was motivated by a post in the Streets of Salem blog: First-period Fantasy. Many call this house the 'Bradstreet House.' Streets of Salem used 'Downing-Bradstreet' which is more correct. See image. 
  • Chronicles of old Salem - the book mentions Joseph ( 1675) being killed. We are using it to fill in our text scroll (see the portal to truth). 
---

Children (according to the NEHGS and the Great Migration Project - as represented by WikiTree): ThomasGeorgeRichardJohnSarahSamuelJosephMiriamSeeth.

Remarks: Modified: 12/01/2019 

12/01/2019 -- Added the image of the house of Ann and Joseph. Plus more links. We'll be updating these posts of the kids through time.

John Gardner

John (WikiTree) was the third son; he was born in England or in New England. There was been some controversy on that.

These posts of the children will pull together recent research as well as provide links to former work.

  • John and the Merrimack survey - John was out as a young man with a crew that went to survey the Merrimack. No doubt, he was the muscle, however he would have learned a lot from the experience. 
  • Mary (Gardner) Coffin - John's daughter married Jethro Coffin. Some say that this helped solve a long problem between two groups on Nantucket, namely the first settlers and the late-comers. 
  • Sherborne - it was the brothers on Nantucket who kept the information about Sherborne as the place of origins alive. 
  • Stories and unwindings - the Gardners had a good reputation on Nantucket. They were noted to have been educated which did not come from Harvard. The best guess? Their parents, especially Margaret. 

... more edits coming ...


Children (according to the NEHGS and the Great Migration Project - as represented by WikiTree): ThomasGeorgeRichardJohnSarahSamuelJosephMiriamSeeth.

Remarks: Modified: 12/02/2019 

11/30/2019 --

George Gardner

George (WikiTree) was the second son and was born in England.

 After he wrote his 1907 book on Thomas Gardner, Dr. Frank worked on the Gardner Memorial book (1933) which looked at the descendants of George Gardner.

These posts of the children will pull together recent research as well as provide links to former work.

  • Gardner-Wyman-Peabody - this mill was owned by a descendant of George. 
  • Gardner-Pingree - this house was owned by a descendant of George (and his brother, Samuel) and was lost by the family during the turmoils of the War of 1812 with its blockades that interrupted commercial naval activity. 
  • Ruth Gardner - George's daughter married John Hathorne. 

... more edits coming ...


Children (according to the NEHGS and the Great Migration Project - as represented by WikiTree): ThomasGeorgeRichardJohnSarahSamuelJosephMiriamSeeth.

Remarks: Modified: 12/02/2019 

11/30/2019 --

Friday, November 29, 2019

Thomas Gardner

Thomas (WikiTree) was the eldest son, born in England. His parents (Thomas Gardner and Margaret Fryer) look to have been married in Sherborne, Dorset in 1617. There were baptism records in that area and time for Thomas, George, and Richard.

Thomas has several mentions in Salem records. Along with George, Samuel and Joseph (his brothers) he was "ordered to survey and measure from the meeting house to a meadow along the river Westerly from Salem." As well as being a cordwinder, Thomas kept a "merchandise store" with "10 pages of inventory" which was recorded at his death.

Thomas married 1) Hannah  in 1641 and 2) Elizabeth Horne in 1665. He had ten children.

... more edits coming ...



Children (according to the NEHGS and the Great Migration Project - as represented by WikiTree): Thomas, GeorgeRichard, JohnSarahSamuel, JosephMiriamSeeth.

Remarks: Modified: 12/02/2019 

11/29/2019 --

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

Richard Gardner

We have a page for some of the children and will have one per. Why? There is open research being done, and post are a good way to collect material and comments.

There was an earlier one in which Richard and John featured. That dealt with Nantucket issues. Some of Richard's descendants were mentioned, such as Folger (coffee company) and Macy (store with the red star). we got to looking at Richard while tracking down the ancestry of the namesake of Fort Worth, TX: William Jenkins Worth who was a pre-Civil-War officer in the U.S. Army. One of his forebears married a descendant of Richard; however, she had died, and a new wife was involved. Those close-calls are interesting.

As we were collecting Thomas descendants (Wikipedia page), Richard's (WikiTree) descendant line was touched upon more often than it was for others. For instance, look at the category of "Academic/science/arts" for an example of this.

Richard named one of his daughters Miriam. He had a sister, Miriam (Gardner) Hill, so we just added some information about the niece.

One open issue is where was Richard born? It might have been England, however some claim that he was born here, in New England. This is an example, like that of Margaret Fryer, of work to be done by the family rather than from researchers looking at the wider scope. There are more which we will itemize.

... more edits coming ...


Children (according to the NEHGS and the Great Migration Project - as represented by WikiTree): ThomasGeorgeRichardJohnSarahSamuelJosephMiriamSeeth.

Remarks: Modified: 12/05/2019 

11/27/2019 -- The kids (each will have link): ThomasGeorgeRichardJohnSarahSamuelJosephMiriamSeeth.

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

The blog and the metrical

Remember when blogs were new? It was not that long ago. Nowadays, this means of information conveyance seems to be part of the structure of material on the internet. Start a new website, and a blog is included (albeit, optionally).

To us, our blog is like a huge, annotated outline of future material plus an evolving index. We are at a point where we'll look back on a regular basis as we have 10 years coming up from the first post (Welcome - 25 Sep 2010). As with many genealogy bloggers, for example Nutfield Genealogy (Heather Wilkinson Rojo' genealogy site), we have collected and provided some numbers over the years. Example: Summary, 2018. These were overview types. However, if you look deep, you will see that all of the ISP-level activity is logged to excruciating levels.

So, there will continue to be metrics shown and discussed. For starters, there is now a page related to things metrical. Why pages? They allow additional structure; one can get lost in the sea of posts; even keywords don't help that much.

Another aspect to look at is size of the post. As well as writing the post, we have been adding Remarks over the years. Some of the posts have increased in size. An example is the one that has collected material with respect to a shipwreck, The Gardiner that was, which is about 2,500 words which includes a lot of links. This is an area of open research.

BTW, we have a couple other blogs going and will report on those, too.

Remarks: Modified: 11/26/2019

11/26/2019 --