Saturday, April 2, 2022

Lorenzo and Peggy

TL;DR -- GB issues give us a chance to pull together the disparate paths of research required with what we are doing. One theme is identifying descendants. But, relating them to the time and turmoil of their lives is as important. In fact, more demanding in order to get history corrected. Take the frontier which was an experience for over a century. People out west enduring whilst the east coast basked in their civilized way. Well, not. New York and rats, say. Except, idyllic views never are other than mental states. In any case, we have been finding people who were there. An overlooked group were the circuit riders who carried the message of the Gospel out to the lonely regions. Lorenzo and Peggy are an example; he is a descendant of Miriam. On the other hand, our work has shown whole groups of people being ignored due to their having difficulties in a paper trail, many times due to decisions that might be considered suspect if looked at properly. 

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While working on Gardner's Beacon, Vol. XII, No. 1, we thought to have Women's History Month as one of the themes. We have an ongoing effort at finding descendants of Thomas and Margaret by child and have completed the 1st pass for each child. We have more information for some than for others; trying to obtain more for those with less information is a definite must. 

Aside: Our request is that those who are interested try to help us fill in the missing pieces. We suggest using WikiTree for this effort. 

One for whom there is a lack of information about descendants is Miriam. While looking at her WikiTree profile, we ran across Lorenzo Dow (WikiTree Profile) who is the 5th generation, but, having been born in 1777, he missed the Revolution (SAR/DAR). 

We have been concentrating on generational details as a means to study the History of the U.S. Along this line, we are looking particularly at how Harvard maps to  U.S. history. That focus will be explained more in the near future. But, we can categorize descendants into broad areas that have interest, such as commerce, military, academia, and more. Lorenzo was a preacher, of note. We picked him due to our year's research into the Frontier Century that occurred in the U.S. after Jefferson's deal and prior to the majority of States gaining their independence. Along that line, looking at a study of Cape Ann to Patriot (or Loyalist) has been fruitful in finding research areas of interest. 

Aside: In one case, we became familiar with a frontier church that even carries a name associated with such, Cumberland Presbyterian. What we notice is that the frontier experience is really dissed by lots of genealogists. Those who live in the central regions and are of families here a while face obstacles that are man made. We are prepared to discuss this at length. 

We have had several posts so far that related to church work. There have been quite a few Quaker posts. We also reported that a descendant of Sarah was the first Chaplain, U.S. Navy. His father had been Chaplain for the Royal Navy.  

   Lorenzo Dow    Margaret Holcomb

Lorenzo Dow, though, was of the frontier and was circuit rider for the Methodist Church. He married Margaret Holcomb whose family was out of Connecticut. She is known as Peggy Dow (WikiTree Profile) and was an author as was her husband. She and Lorenzo met at a revival. Their lives Both lived in the time of various awakenings that happened across the world which is a theme of importance to the U.S. 

Aside: We noted Holcomb earlier with respect to a railroad town in Kansas. 

The WikiTree profile for both Lorenzo and Peggy point to additional material for further reading about their lives and thoughts. They had one child who died young. That puts them on the list with Joseph and Ann (see The Downings), which is of people to not forget. So, expect more about this couple as we bring attention to scores of families who have been ignored with the east coast prejudices that are obvious. 

Aside: Mayflower? In the beginning, only used the male line. Others, about as dim. This past two years has brought the notion to our attention. For instance, some like to tout their status as a descendant of William  (the Norman). But, he had a sister who had lots of offspring. Following along those lines finds lots of example where her progeny were there with those of his, yet, there is a difference. Say, in the time of the Magna Carta signing (sealing), the main hot head is well known. Those of the sister not so much. Makes us wonder. Why? Similar experience hundreds of years later and all along the corridors of time.  

Remarks: Modified: 04/02/2022

04/02/2022 --

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