Sunday, December 3, 2017

American manhood

Let's see, from the beginning, I have seen Thomas as an example of the American everyman. I gave him a title of the 'backbone' of the country. That is, his type represents such. There has been a whole series of posts related to this, such as juxtaposing John Gardner (son) being out with the crew that mapped the Merrimack with those of the early Harvard times arguing the 'angels on a pinhead' sort of thing. Too, Thomas appeared to be the first true gentleman of the Dorset effort. He stepped aside for Roger (ancestor, so no conflict there). Of course, he did get back the house when Roger and friends went over to Salem (see Cape Ann, of course and (Not) Far from idyllic). There are more posts on that theme. When John (Endicott) came over, the great house was in good shape, enough to be moved to Salem. So, Thomas and Margaret and kids, evidently, took great care of it.

Now, switching perspective, of late, I have been studying Virginia. We did live there but did not pay much attention (you know, big DC across the river). Then, I started to research families who were both of the south and the north (Southern New England). Then, I read a book review recently that talked the early times. After all, did we not see the Mayflower celebration, again? So, who had the the First Thanksgiving over here. I remembered a book that I bought in DC way back in the '90s and never read. It covers the first seventeen years. Remember, they had their 400th in 2007 (as we ought to have seen in Maine, too, due to the Popham venture).

But, the new book being reviewed talked about martial law. Even the 'wheel' was mentioned. So, there will be more on this but, for now, look at this book from 2011 (New Men: Manliness in Early America). Hence, the title of this post.

Also, consider the Wikipedia page on the time of Sir Thomas Dale. My thought was: now, that is something to be thankful for, that the martial law did not take. Subsequent literature suggested how this may have gone down, including the recent book.

But, the northerners were no angels, either. To wit (only one example), selling native combatants into slavery in the Caribbean. They actually did this, to boot, with Quakers, including children.

So, there will be more on this topic. We have to look at all sides of the story (Thomas and Margaret left us mostly with a tabla raza, except for their children).

Remarks: Modified: 12/03/2017

12/03/2017 --

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Gardner's Beacon, Vol VII, No 2

This issue of Gardner's Beacon gives additional reporting on our research activity. Too, we have the first print of The Gardner Annals in which issues of Gardner's Beacon (Vols. I, II, III) are provided in an appendix. This print edition included Vols. I and II of the TGA.

GB Vol VII_No2
In the current issue of Gardner's Beacon, we continue to look at The Massachusetts Magazine. All of the issues have now been reviewed with their Table of Contents reprinted. Too, we have looked closely at a few articles that are pertinent. Both Dr. Frank and his sister, Lucie, were regular contributors to the magazine. Too, Charles Alcott Flagg, of the Library of Congress, wrote a regular series on western pioneers from Massachusetts to Michigan.

Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson was an early advisory editor. He will be one of the TMM supporters who will be featured in Vol. IV, No. 1 of The Gardner Annals which is undergoing preparation. A descendant of Count Rumford provides a short article in the TMM about efforts related to honoring the gentleman. We will take a closer look. Vol IV will print with Vol. III in the next printing to be ready in early spring of 2018.

The current print version of the TGA (Vol I and II) and GB (Vol I, II, III) can be obtained through emailing for instructions: publications@TGSoc.org.

See Vol. VII, No. 2 of Gardner's Beacon for the issue (PDF).

Remarks: Modified: 12/01/2017

11/30/2017 --

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

First Thanksgiving

So, keeping our southern cousins in mind, we can look at their early experiences and compare those with the Mayflower group and the Cape Group and other early arrivers, including Samuel Maverick who explored the area that became Boston very early.

And, in 1619, they were thankful. Here are their words (Hatch, pg 45).
    A number of the papers concerned with the initial establishment of Berkeley Hundred survive and at least give an insight into what was intended. The undertaking was expected to reflect "to the honor of allmighty god, the inlargeinge of Christian religion and to the augmentation and renowne of the generall plantation in that cuntry, and the particular good and profit of ourselves, men and servants, as wee hope." There was a very special instruction, perhaps, of some unusual note: "wee ordaine that the day of our ships arrivall at the place assigned for plantation in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perputualy keept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty god." Was this the first specific Thanksgiving Day in America?
Albeit, this was twelve years post the first entry. Next up, we will recount the number of new arrivals and the deaths over that first decade.

The Virginia effort was commercial. Some of the issues were the capitalists looking for profit. The Mayflower was a flight to whatever. Lots to read there and discuss. Then, Cape Ann was, again, commercial. And, the capitalists, in their cushy environment, wanted their payback. So, the U.S. was down the line, quite a ways, however a proper look at our history ought to start with Virginia, especially the Roanoke effort. Too, Maine was settled, albeit briefly, in 1607.

Remarks: Modified: 11/21/2017

11/21/2017 -

Monday, November 20, 2017

Southern New England



Having been given a chance to look at descendant lines from Virginia, I had to take advantage of learning about its History. As I read, parallels with Northern New England stood out. For instance, in the south, there was early migration out west just as we saw in Massachusetts. Too, there were two  rides similar to Paul Revere's. One of them saved Thomas Jefferson. Then, the themes related to Albion's Seed apply to our work.

Today, I picked up a book that I had purchased in D.C. back in 1997. I lived in Virginia for a while. Too, I visit it often. 1997 was 12 years  before I started to do this historic genealogical work. And, it has taken a while for me to get to read it.

The book? It had been copyrighted in 1957. The author is Charles E. Hatch, Jr. The title: The First Seventeen Years, Virginia 1607-1624. There are various on-line versions that one can find on the web. Some of these have a preview mode.

It was this content on page 23 that got my attention.
    Participation in the affairs of government was another element in the new Company approach. Soon after his arrival, Yeardley issued a call for the first representative legislative assembly in America which convened at Jamestown on July 30, 1619, and remained in session until August 4. This was the beginning of our present system of representative government. The full intent behind the moves that led to this historic meeting may never be known. It seems to have been another manifestation of the determination to give those Englishmen in America the rights and privileges of Englishmen at home that had been guaranteed to them in the original Company charter. It seems to be this rather than a planned attempt to establish self-government in the New World on a scale that might have been in violation of English law and custom at the time. Whatever the motive, the significance of this meeting in the church at Jamestown remains the same. This body of duly chosen representatives of the people has continued in existence and its evolution leads directly to our State legislatures and to the Congress of the United States.
That is, in 1619, Virginia had the first meeting that relates to our current way of life. This was before the arrival of the Mayflower. As the northern crowd gets into the mood (and the tone ramps up, I can hear it out hear in the netherlands, already) of celebration, we ought to juxtapose the whole scene with southern incidents, albeit not with any direct time association. In fact, as I read, parallels are all over the place.

Too, the Mayflower destination was more southern than not.

Many families had representatives in both the north and the south. Some of those who have both pedigrees had ancestors who met while heading west. One example is covered in the article on our flyover country.

Remarks: Modified: 11/22/2017

11/22/2017 -- Looking at parallels will also consider differences: Dales' code (Laws, Divine, Moral, and Martial).

Friday, October 20, 2017

Print - TGA I, II and GB I, II, III

The Thomas Gardner Society, Inc. publication is available that includes Volumes I and II of The Gardner Annals which is our means of reporting results of research and review. Included, as an appendix, are Volumes I, II, and III of Gardner's Beacon, the newsletter of our organization.


Instructions for ordering copies are available by contacting us at publications@tgsoc.org.

Remarks: Modified: 10/20/2017

10/20/2017 --

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

1st printing

We are finishing the cover for our first publication in print. It will include Volumes I and II of The Gardner Annals plus Volumes I, II, and III of Gardner's Beacon.


Our work includes, in part, extending that of Dr. Frank. As such, we will be building a Modifications and Additions section under Publications at our TGSoc site that will cover necessary changes plus new information.

As well, we will have a general inquiries contact at TGSoc[dot]org.

Shortly, we will announce the ordering process.

Remarks: Modified: 10/20/2017

10/20/2017 -- Print copy is available: TGS TGA (I, II) and GB (I, II, III).

Friday, September 8, 2017

Intro page

Over time, we'll be adjusting the web site to be more interactive. We have been using an intro page for awhile now which can point to a current topic.

NEHGR References at TGS site 
We will have another issue of Garner's Beacon this year and of The Gardner Annals. Too, progress is being made on the printing and binding of Volumes I and II of TGA plus three years of GB. Next year, there is a plan to print the remainder issues through the end of 2017. More on this later.

Our new site is: tgsoc.org.

Remarks: Modified: 09/13/2017

09/08/2017 --