Sunday, February 11, 2018

Ground zero

Last time, we mentioned that January 1918 was the last publication of The Massachusetts Magazine. For possible contributing factors, we mentioned WWI as the United States was sending troops to Europe by the summer of 1918. Armistice followed that same year.

Coverage of flu cases, 1918
Another factor was that some of the earlier contributors aged or passed away: Col. Thomas Higginson, F.B. Sanborn, and others. Dr. Frank had collected editors and contributors from the ranks of Civil War veterans and various New England Illuminati.

Given the recent reminder, we must add the Spanish Flu. It was first observed in Kansas (Fort Riley) in March 1918. The map is from the Stanford University article on the pandemic (page has stale links, to be resolved). Not long after, the virus was seen at Camp Devens which is outside of Boston and was established in 1917.

This was the pandemic where we see rows and rows of cots with sick soldiers. During this time, medical personnel would have been extremely busy.

The base was named for Civil War general, Charles Bevens, who was involved in several battles in Virginia.

Remarks: Modified: 03/04/2018

03/04/2018 -- NIH, in 2004, published an article by JM Barry (The site of origin of the 1918 influenza pandemic and its public health implications) who had researched and written about the flu pandemic in 1918. JM points to Dr. Loring Miner as having observed cases in Haskell County in January and February of 1918. By March, the flu heavily hit Fort Riley. Haskell County is southwest of Dodge City and is named for Dudley C. Haskell who had moved to Lawrence, KS with his family in 1855. Dudley was the namesake of Haskell Indian Nations University.

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Last issue of The Massachusetts Magazine

While researching for the next issue (IV) of the TGA in which we will look at Volumes VI through XI of The Massachusetts Magazine, we were reminded that the last issue of this periodical was 100 years ago, this month (January 1918). This effort by Dr. Frank and friends ran for ten years. We looked at Volumes I through V in the last TGA issue (Vol III). These two will be printed under one cover in the spring of this year.

Frontispiece and counts by volume
So, how to look back at the effort and bring the TMM forward? As I read the articles, I have two things in mind. This was an American effort, as in the participants were, for the most part, of families who were involved with the development of the country, from the beginning. An example is Col. Higginson, His family is pre-Winthrop's arrival in 1630. Too, Gardner and Higginson go way back. Dr. Frank's publisher was Higginson.

The image shows the page count by volumes for the TMM. Volume I was published in 1908. For the most part, the issues were quarterly. In each issue, Dr. Frank presented material related to a regiment that was at the Seige of Boston. Lucie, his sister, carried on Sidney Perley's work for several issues. Judge Thompson presented several articles on his western adventure as a youth, not long after the trek of Lewis and Clark.

As one looks at the TOC of each issue (see this post for a listing - TMM, Vol. I and II which starts a series that provides links to's digitized issues), one sees that things get sparse about five years in. After our initial introductory look at each issue, which is about done (TGA Vols III and IV), we will start to do a deeper dive into the material. A lot of the topics are still apropos. And, looking at the TMM got me to look at other periodicals, such as The Atlantic (still publishing, albeit they moved from Boston to DC). Also, other topics, such as the Lyceum, came to the attention.

Remarks: Modified: 02/16/2018

01/20/2018 -- As we go through the remaining volumes (VI through XI), we are accumulating more material for additional research and publication. In 1917, the culmination of the discussion about Europe was the U.S. conscription and the initiation of U.S. troop involvement in Europe.

In the October issue of the TMM, in 1914, there was a report on the attitude about Europe. New England favored the Allies. The majority of the respondents to the survey of the Literary Digest were neutral. The survey was of editors of newspapers in the U.S.

Prior to that year, there had been many articles provided by older gents, such as Col. Higginson, F.B. Sanborn and F.M. Thompson who were veterans of the U.S. Civil war. Judge Thompson wrote a series on his western jaunt. Now that we have gone through the entire Table of Contents (all issues) with a quick read, we can get into the depth of the articles and study how they pertain to our interest in research. We intend to publish the digitized pages in future TGA issues.

02/11/2018 -- The Spanish flu would have been a contributing factor to the demise of The Massachusetts Magazine. The flu was first observed in Kansas in March of 1918, however it was in Massachusetts by summer.

02/16/2018 -- Our first post on The Massachusetts Magazine was May 28, 2014. Since then, we have published a copy of the Table of Contents for each issue and have reviewed all of the issues. The first five volumes were summarized in The Gardner Annals (Vol. III), We will have a similar look at the last six volumes in the next issue of The Gardner Annals. TGA Vol III and Vol IV are expected to print in the spring of 2018.

Sunday, December 31, 2017

Call for material

We are putting together the next print of The Gardner Annals. It will include Volumes III and IV and the remainder of the issues of Gardner's Beacon. This is the proposed Table of Contents.

There is still time to suggest an inclusion. Like? Something that you have written about your line. An overview of your relationship to Thomas Gardner of Salem. Any other pertinent topic? Notice that we included a guest article on 'Bosworth and Gardners' and 'Magna Carta' in TGA, Vol. III. 

We published Vols. I and II this fall. Next, we will have Vols. III and IV. Then, we expect to publish once a year given the material that is available. 

Lets us hear from you at 

Remarks: Modified: 02/16/2018

02/16/2018 --

Alfred L. Gardner, Ph.D.

This past fall, Alfred L. Gardner, a descendant of Samuel, was named a Lifetime Achiever by the Marquis Who's Who. In 2016, Alfred 'earned a Scientific Achievement Award' from the US Geological Survey. 
Born in Salem, MA, Alfred moved with his family to Tucson, AZ after WWII. He attended Tucson High School. As an undergraduate, Alfred was a R.O.T.C. commander at the University of Arizona. He completed his education at the University of Arizona, Louisiana State University, and the University of Texas (M.D. Anderson Institute). After a teaching stint at Louisiana State and Tulane, Alfred moved to Washington, DC to work with the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center with his offices in The National Museum of Natural  History - Smithsonian Institution. Alfred served as Curator, for a time, at the NMNH. Earlier, as a young biologist, Alfred helped establish the displays at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum which is near Tucson.
Alfred is a member of many scientific organizations, editor of several journals, author of over 200 refereed papers, and is a Fellow of the AAAS.

This is the first of a series where we would like to announce accomplishments of descendants of Thomas Gardner Society. For those, we can do an ahnentafel. Alfred's paternal grandfather and grandmother are fully documented in the 1st printing of The Gardner Annals (Vols I and II). Alfred is also a descendant of Thomas Gardner of Roxbury.

Remarks: Modified: 12/31/2017

12/31/2017 --

Sunday, December 3, 2017

American manhood

Let's see, from the beginning, I have seen Thomas as an example of the American everyman. I gave him a title of the 'backbone' of the country. That is, his type represents such. There has been a whole series of posts related to this, such as juxtaposing John Gardner (son) being out with the crew that mapped the Merrimack with those of the early Harvard times arguing the 'angels on a pinhead' sort of thing. Too, Thomas appeared to be the first true gentleman of the Dorset effort. He stepped aside for Roger (ancestor, so no conflict there). Of course, he did get back the house when Roger and friends went over to Salem (see Cape Ann, of course and (Not) Far from idyllic). There are more posts on that theme. When John (Endicott) came over, the great house was in good shape, enough to be moved to Salem. So, Thomas and Margaret and kids, evidently, took great care of it.

Now, switching perspective, of late, I have been studying Virginia. We did live there but did not pay much attention (you know, big DC across the river). Then, I started to research families who were both of the south and the north (Southern New England). Then, I read a book review recently that talked the early times. After all, did we not see the Mayflower celebration, again? So, who had the the First Thanksgiving over here. I remembered a book that I bought in DC way back in the '90s and never read. It covers the first seventeen years. Remember, they had their 400th in 2007 (as we ought to have seen in Maine, too, due to the Popham venture).

But, the new book being reviewed talked about martial law. Even the 'wheel' was mentioned. So, there will be more on this but, for now, look at this book from 2011 (New Men: Manliness in Early America). Hence, the title of this post.

Also, consider the Wikipedia page on the time of Sir Thomas Dale. My thought was: now, that is something to be thankful for, that the martial law did not take. Subsequent literature suggested how this may have gone down, including the recent book.

But, the northerners were no angels, either. To wit (only one example), selling native combatants into slavery in the Caribbean. They actually did this, to boot, with Quakers, including children.

So, there will be more on this topic. We have to look at all sides of the story (Thomas and Margaret left us mostly with a tabla raza, except for their children).

Remarks: Modified: 12/03/2017

12/03/2017 --

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Gardner's Beacon, Vol VII, No 2

This issue of Gardner's Beacon gives additional reporting on our research activity. Too, we have the first print of The Gardner Annals in which issues of Gardner's Beacon (Vols. I, II, III) are provided in an appendix. This print edition included Vols. I and II of the TGA.

GB Vol VII_No2
In the current issue of Gardner's Beacon, we continue to look at The Massachusetts Magazine. All of the issues have now been reviewed with their Table of Contents reprinted. Too, we have looked closely at a few articles that are pertinent. Both Dr. Frank and his sister, Lucie, were regular contributors to the magazine. Too, Charles Alcott Flagg, of the Library of Congress, wrote a regular series on western pioneers from Massachusetts to Michigan.

Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson was an early advisory editor. He will be one of the TMM supporters who will be featured in Vol. IV, No. 1 of The Gardner Annals which is undergoing preparation. A descendant of Count Rumford provides a short article in the TMM about efforts related to honoring the gentleman. We will take a closer look. Vol IV will print with Vol. III in the next printing to be ready in early spring of 2018.

The current print version of the TGA (Vol I and II) and GB (Vol I, II, III) can be obtained through emailing for instructions:

See Vol. VII, No. 2 of Gardner's Beacon for the issue (PDF).

Remarks: Modified: 12/01/2017

11/30/2017 --

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

First Thanksgiving

So, keeping our southern cousins in mind, we can look at their early experiences and compare those with the Mayflower group and the Cape Group and other early arrivers, including Samuel Maverick who explored the area that became Boston very early.

And, in 1619, they were thankful. Here are their words (Hatch, pg 45).
    A number of the papers concerned with the initial establishment of Berkeley Hundred survive and at least give an insight into what was intended. The undertaking was expected to reflect "to the honor of allmighty god, the inlargeinge of Christian religion and to the augmentation and renowne of the generall plantation in that cuntry, and the particular good and profit of ourselves, men and servants, as wee hope." There was a very special instruction, perhaps, of some unusual note: "wee ordaine that the day of our ships arrivall at the place assigned for plantation in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perputualy keept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty god." Was this the first specific Thanksgiving Day in America?
Albeit, this was twelve years post the first entry. Next up, we will recount the number of new arrivals and the deaths over that first decade.

The Virginia effort was commercial. Some of the issues were the capitalists looking for profit. The Mayflower was a flight to whatever. Lots to read there and discuss. Then, Cape Ann was, again, commercial. And, the capitalists, in their cushy environment, wanted their payback. So, the U.S. was down the line, quite a ways, however a proper look at our history ought to start with Virginia, especially the Roanoke effort. Too, Maine was settled, albeit briefly, in 1607.

Remarks: Modified: 11/21/2017

11/21/2017 -