Wednesday, October 17, 2018

New twist

Sidney comes through, again. First of all, he and Dr. Frank worked together. Then, Lucie picked up Sidney's work and published such in The Massachusetts Magazine. So, expect to hear more about Sidney and his work, such as the following.

Of late, I have been trying to assess what happened to the bodies at Gardner Hill. When I first started this work, the general thing was there was a transfer to Harmony Grove Cemetery. That is, everyone was moved nicely. Re-interned, in other words. But, where in the Cemetery? By the Peabody gate? And, one write up says, well, it was only a handful of yards. In fact, there is misinformation everywhere I go to read on this topic.

So, we'll post an improvement once we know a little more.

Well, let's look at Sidney's map (The Essex Antiquarian, Vol VI, No 4, October 1902, pg 149). He shows the burial plot as being north of the Trask one. Too, it is toward Boston/Main. So, according to the scale, we're talking a couple hundred of yards.

Of course, Sidney did this from the ground, given his times. However, he was thorough so I accept his depiction. According to the satellite map of Google, we are talking almost 1,000 feet (well, 300 yards).

However, there is a winkle. Dr. Frank saw notes from Samuel Pickering Gardner where he mentioned his visit to the burial plot in the 1830s, before the road work, and some stones had already been moved and some broken. In other words, graves were already lost in terms of identification. All for commerce. Of course, Samuel P. was upset.

And, Samuel P. said that the seller was William (Harvard grad, so we're talking a secular influence more than mere money - well, it's a debate that continues) who I am researching further (How close is close?). He is a descendant of Samuel (#6 in the book), son of Thomas. Now, Samuel P. is a descendant of George (#3 in the book), who was the brother of Samuel. In this map, the Samuel who owned the plot north of Abel is a son of George. And, Samuel's plot is right above Abel's who was a son of the original Samuel.     

This re-look came about since I heard this year that stones were moved. What? The bodies were cast into the river? Gosh, the fire? Payback? So, we can say, some. How many? Who was there? We need to research this. Where to start? All sorts of questions.

Well, this is more of a story than the witch thing that is so popular, somewhat. We have culture (Harvard and not), history (the rush to do shoes, etc.), and technology. I'm trying to envision how Gardner Hill was leveled. Too, what was the elevation change? All of this can be answered one way or another.

However, Sidney saves the day. He mentions that some bodies were moved to Trask's plot. That makes a whole lot of sense. So, thank you, Trask family. Their plot was closer, actually, than Harmony Grove. It wasn't commercial (don't worry, I have been gathering the history of the place, before, after and so forth).


So, we now have three classes of people: those whose remains were moved to Harmony Grove, those whose remains went to Trask's plot, and those whose remains were lost due to the stones being removed to allow for industrial expansion. Then, we can talk the different classes of stones. Not many survived. Two trophy stones stand in Harmony Grove (placating the conscience?). We may not be able to identify all who were put into Gardner's burial ground, but we ought to make an effort. Now of those were moved to Trask, did the stones go with them? Of course, many may not have had stones.

At least, we need to get the verbiage in an improved state in order to tell the story a little better.

Of course, the seller did not get the buyer to honor the 'in perpetuity' that was supposedly left behind. Ah, lots of other angles to look at, too.

Remarks: Modified: 10/17/2018

10/17/2018 --

Locales and their history

A 100 years ago, there was a huge growth in interest in local history. This was everywhere. At the same time, people got interested, again, in genealogy. If you look at the books written, a slew came out in that period. Some families started post-Civil-War.

Of course, the New England Historic Genealogical Society got its start in the 1830s. They are going strong. Dr. Frank started his The Massachusetts Magazine in 1908. That was right after his 1907 book on Thomas Gardner (Planter) - motivation for this Society - came out. It went on for a decade, covering a variety of subject.

Our theme comes from that, too: culture/history/technology. Now, recall that technology is broad and would include genealogy. As, those slew of books? Many are more misinformation than not. Fortunately, Dr. Frank took care when researching for and writing his.

Nowadays, we see the influence of the web which surpasses what print could do. It can spread mischief further and faster, too. But, it'll be around in one form or another. We are trying to establish a stable, trustworthy presence there, that would get Cape Ann more well known, in all aspects, including, of course, the people: Thomas and Margaret with their cohorts.

A couple of years ago, we adopted an additional view, related to the western movement. New England drove some of that. In fact, before the Civil War there was a partitioning of locales according to which side it was put. Kansas was free; Col. Higginson went there to bring support to the free state'rs. He wrote of his experiences.

Besides the re-look at history and people (families), groups formed. We mentioned the NEHGS. There was the Old Planters Society. D.A.R. formed. All over the country, D.A.R. helped bring a historical focus.

This is one example: Wichita, KS. Note the digital copy is at archive[dot]org. It was published in 1914 by the oldest chapter of D.A.R. in Wichita (formed 1896). The Chapter had daughters of Patriots, known as 'Real daughters' (see related page). Too, the Chapter sponsored research into the Santa Fe Trail (see History&Preservation page).

In 2020, there will be celebrations of the arrival of the Mayflower (400th). The Cape Ann crew came not long after, founding Massachusetts. Virginia already had their 400th in 2007. BTW, Kansas had its in 1941 giving a nod to de Coronado's visit.

For the 300th anniversaries, there were many celebrations. Salem had a historic pageant. Dr. Frank played Roger Conant. His sister was

So, as we explore the spread of Thomas and Margaret descendants (and their collateral families) and look at "All things Gardner" over the next few years, the theme of locales will be constant.

Remarks: Modified: 10/17/2018

10/17/2018 --

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Gentleman, every man, and much more

Right now, this post has links to posts from several different points in time. We are reviewing the posts as a means to assess the research done so far, to see where we need to put more attention, and to lay out future research.

This is one theme of many that will be of continual interest. It has to do with Thomas. But, we will focus on Margaret, too. For the kids? We need to get the first five generations identified. Then, there are a slew of topics that are general, such as The Massachusetts Magazine, collateral families, WikiTree (technology, in general), and such.

These posts are all from the TGS blog except for the last one. As well, there will be things pulled from work being done on Quora.


A related theme deals with Rev. Hubbard who talked to people of the time. And, wrote then, too. He gets no respect (we'll look at that). Yes, the Roger Dangerfield of that era.

Note to genealogists: People have being without your weighing in with your assessment of documents. In fact, your research does not make the 'truth' of the matter. You people are mere servants; get over yourselves.

Remarks: Modified: 10/13/2018

10/13/2018 --

Reviews and news

Back in April of 2015, we did a matrix of metrics related to posts per month. The blog started in September of 2010. So, that four complete years and two partial years. The month and year that had the highest number of posts were marked.

It goes like this. Read and read. Then, when some threshold is met, write. Given that the blogger is a novice in this area, there was more reading than writing. Good sign? So, the two years that had a month with a good number of posts were 2011 and 2014. So, what was going on in those months? Well, we can look at the title of the posts and get some idea.

Also, note that the blog uses Remarks which can be quite extensive. So, rather than making another posts, most of the time, there is something added to an existing post. We'll go back and see which of the posts had the most extensions over the years.

So, going forward, here is a report that adds in the other years. It provides the table of counts and then, shows the titles of the posts for the months that were maximum for the given year. 


In August of 2011 (seven posts), the topics covered were contributions by John Goff, mentioning of Isabella of the museum, taking notice of the house built in the first year in Cape Ann, and a few other topics, like Gardner's Beacon, Vol. I, No. 3. But, note that there is a post which is titled 'True gentleman' that will be the topic of a coming post and article. It has to do with the fact that Conant was patted on the back for giving the reins to Endicott when he arrived. He was called a gentleman for letting loose of the power. Well, prior to that Gardner bowed to Conant. And, he and Margaret (we can use that name, folks) moved out of the house. The house? Yes, the one that Higginson, later, exulted about in his writings about New England. It was the fair house where Endicott provided a feast for Winthrop when he first arrived.

Note: all of this was written in various posts and in articles in Gardner's Beacon.

So, we'll get something from that review. Now, going to 2014, there was July and September with six posts each. In July, the posts dealt with John Gardner's early years, the source of the 'first governor' label that someone attached to Thomas, and issues related to Gardner's Beacon (now in the fourth volume) and the website. But, incorporation details were being wrapped up, to boot. So, that was a varied lot.

In September, the topics were The Gardner Annals which was in Volume I and provides our means to report research activities and finding. Guess what? That was the month that John Cook was querying about 'whence' issues and noted that there was a marriage notice that had been digitized. At the time, I posted the news at WikiTree (see the tree for Dr. Frank). This year, there was a discussion about the three wives proposed by Anderson of NEHGS, however we can now show that there were two.

We took these two years, 2011 and 2014, since they were covered in the earlier post. Next up, we'll look at the remaining years. In the meantime, the table is through September of 2018.
 
Note: at some point, will put in links to posts dealing with these subjects.

Remarks: Modified: 10/13/2018

10/13/2018 --

Sunday, September 30, 2018

TGA III and IV, print of

At long last (early discussion, June) and with the summer being over, we have completed the compilation for print of The Gardner Annals, Vols. III and IV, and Gardner's Beacon, Vols. IV, V, VI, and VII. This is a preview look (see Table of Contents, below), from the publisher. 


We have ordered both color and black/white copies and expect to receive our shipment from the printers within the week. Instructions for ordering can be obtained by notifying us at publications@tgsoc.org. 

The issue contains all of the Table of Contents for The Massachusetts Magazine. Too, we have articles concerning history and genealogy. As well, future topics are discussed, briefly. 

Remarks: Modified: 10/14/2018

10/14/2018 -- We have the printed copies in house, reading for shipping.

Saturday, September 22, 2018

Comment and Criticism

We will have our second print (TGA Vol III and IV) soon as preparatory activities are drawing to a close. We recently got notice of an error in one of the early articles (TGA Vol II No 1 - Henry D. Gardiner and the barque Bostonian). Before that, I noticed some minor errors in the first print edition. For example, in TGA  Vol I No 1, I typed 1935 rather than 1933 (twice) while referencing Dr. Frank's Gardner Memorial book. Then, I noticed that the footnotes ought to have refreshed across major sections. This is corrected in the second print.

But, we had already run into some issues with Gardner's Beacon. In that case, we created Afterthoughts and modifications to handle those. For example, in GB Vol III, No 4, I had used something read on the web without verifying the thing (tsk). The implication that I read was that Damaris' first husband had been discovered. Well, it was not true, and I was too much of a newbie to know the difference. In any case, we later heard from an excited Shattuck descendant wanting to know more. So, I traced my steps which is crucial and found out that the website was gone. Ah.

Incidentally, this happens a lot on ancestry (pity those poor folks) and carries even into WikiTree. It's not the bloom off the rose, but it is tiring. How can we make it better? Well, be more careful. And, there are ways to do this. Too, one sees it in Wikipedia, especially when someone writes an erroneous page to begin with.

So, this from an entry in What's new (general one for TGS, for now).
It points to a post on Nantucket and the wonderful work of Eliza Starbuck Barney. The Nantucket site exults on their being true to Eliza's work. Yes. But, as I have seen all over, no one seems to have a way to present corrections. The proverbial tale is that a correction is in small print on page 15 in a 40 page paper. But, we need to do better; and, the TGS does have an interest in this.

So, we will keep with the afterthought approach with Gardner's Beacon. What to do with TheGardner Annals? We'll follow Dr. Frank, hence the title of this post. In his The Massachusetts Magazine, he had a section that was titled, usually, Comment and Criticism. See the TOC of Vol. VII (example from No 4). The sub-heading is "On books and other subjects" which is more broad than handling errata. However, any correction ought to be more than mere overwriting.

So, in the case of H.D. Gardiner, we will write an article on this. Turns out that this wife was a Thomas Gardner descendant, too. And, it involves movement from New England. Ah,  yes, the western migration.

So, there is a page on TGSoc.org dealing with Publications. It will point to this post, however we will be introducing changes to ThomasGardnerSociety.org that will include the facility to meet this requirement.

Remarks: Modified: 09/15/2018

09/15/2018 --

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Pressing day

Now that we have Dr. Frank's pedigree in WikiTree, we can use it for articles.

This post is timely in that Giles Corey died on the 19th of September in 1692. Three days later, his wife (Martha Corey) was hanged with others. Two of these are ancestors of Dr. Frank (Wikipedia -- Samuel Wardwell and Mary Ayers Parker) -- (WikiTree -- Samuel Wardwell and Mary Ayers Parker) through his grandmother, Lucy Foster (Wilson) Gardner.

Now, the title? Giles was pressed for a couple of days before he succumbed. His friend, John Gardner son of Thomas and Margaret, was there.

The topic of 1692 events will come up for discussion in the near future. To facilitate this discussion, here are related posts for reference:
  • Great Salem Fire of 1914 (4 Jun 2014) -- Started on upper Boston Street and ran down to the shore. 
  • Andover ordeal (28 Apr 2014) -- While researching Samuel and Mary, we were following the Wilson line of Lucy. There were two generations that married and doubled down on the witch connections. Samuel's granddaughter lost twelve of fourteen of her children in their childhood. 
  • Essex recollections (3 Sep 2013) -- About the extended family and friends of Francis Dane who were impacted by the Salem madness.   
  • Meeting, again (10 Feb 2013) -- More background. 
  • Imagine a meeting (28 Oct 2012) -- Provides some background and builds a table of participant who were not victims and who are related to Dr. Frank. 
  • Gardner's Beacon, Vol. II, No. 5 (27 Oct 2012) -- John Goff, Salem antiquarian, wrote of the Witch House. The theme of this post was a continuation. 
  • 1692 theme, again (24 Oct 2012) -- Comments while getting Gardner's Beacon Vol. II, No. 5. ready for release. 
  • Salem's madness (19 Nov 2011) -- The English had been mad before. 
  • Gardner's Beacon, Vol. I, No. 4 (21 Oct 2011) -- Got into the theme early. First look at how the incident related to the Gardner family. 
  • Ruth Gardner (18 Sep 2011) -- Daughter of George Gardner, wife of John Hathorne. 
The next issue of Gardner's Beacon will go into this subject a little more. Namely, the commercially exploited look at the witches who were not while 150 graves were disturbed from which event we need to know how many were just stone moves with the remains moved without due notice. One thing to do would be to get a list of people, as best we can, who were buried on Gardner Hill. 

Remarks: Modified: 10/10/2018

10/10/2018 -- Added Essex recollections, and others.