Tuesday, November 21, 2017

First Thanksgiving

So, keeping our southern cousins in mind, we can look at their early experiences and compare those with the Mayflower group and the Cape Group and other early arrivers, including Samuel Maverick who explored the area that became Boston very early.

And, in 1619, they were thankful. Here are their words (Hatch, pg 45).
    A number of the papers concerned with the initial establishment of Berkeley Hundred survive and at least give an insight into what was intended. The undertaking was expected to reflect "to the honor of allmighty god, the inlargeinge of Christian religion and to the augmentation and renowne of the generall plantation in that cuntry, and the particular good and profit of ourselves, men and servants, as wee hope." There was a very special instruction, perhaps, of some unusual note: "wee ordaine that the day of our ships arrivall at the place assigned for plantation in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perputualy keept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty god." Was this the first specific Thanksgiving Day in America?
Albeit, this was twelve years post the first entry. Next up, we will recount the number of new arrivals and the deaths over that first decade.

The Virginia effort was commercial. Some of the issues were the capitalists looking for profit. The Mayflower was a flight to whatever. Lots to read there and discuss. Then, Cape Ann was, again, commercial. And, the capitalists, in their cushy environment, wanted their payback. So, the U.S. was down the line, quite a ways, however a proper look at our history ought to start with Virginia, especially the Roanoke effort. Too, Maine was settled, albeit briefly, in 1607.

Remarks: Modified: 11/21/2017

11/21/2017 -

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