Saturday, May 14, 2016

DNA and genealogy

Recently, Gardner Research was contacted with a DNA question. A researcher who had hit a brick wall over a decade ago decided to be subjected to DNA analysis. His results matched up with that of earlier kits that had been submitted.

Some of the results seemed to show relationships between various Gardner families. That is one of our interests. Details will follow at some point. Overall, there was quite a variety.

So, that was a sufficient trigger event to get us to start to look at DNA in terms of "all things Gardner." As we gather information, we will add to this list (year shown if not current). 
We will also get links to all of the Gardner-related research done so far.

Note: For this list, we will move over to a DNA Project page (at some point).

Remarks: Modified: 02/25/2017

05/15/2016 --Also, we got our attention directed to a lot of information about the Tudor relationship with the Gardners after Bosworth. We will summarize that and provide a bibliography.

05/17/2016 -- With Prof Hamilton's overview, our list covers the basis. He talks about using longitudinal studies within a family to assess change rates.

05/26/2016 -- While looking at the ancestry of the wife of William Marshal, I ran across a DNA study related to the ancient Irish clans. So, let's say, that motivates to get some DNA analysis going though the discussions of issues will continue in the background.

06/10/2016 -- Added link to Genome Research.

11/22/2016 -- A recent ACM Communications (Sex as algorithm) had an article by a gene specialist (biology) and a computational mathematicians. There is a little remark by the authors that things are not as clear as many seem to think. "Gene: A unit of heredity and a region of the DNA that encodes a functional product. It is thought that humans have more than 20,000 of these. However, now that coding is known to be far more complex than originally thought, it is no longer clear how to define these units and their boundaries."We will look at this further in the upcoming The Gardner Annals.

12/11/2016 -- Britons still live in Anglo-Saxon tribal kingdoms, Oxford University finds.

02/25/2017 -- Still at it. Adding in links.


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