Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Research for next issue of TGA

The last TGA issue (Vol III, No 1) covered several research areas. The next issue appears to have even more. This post stops and looks at progress so far.

  • Last time, we looked at Volumes I through V (reprint of article, link to digitized version) of The Massachusetts Magazine. That was really a cursory first look. While going through Volumes VI through XI, we took time to dive into all of the issues. So, we will provide a look at the Table of Contents, again. However, we will start to report on the dive. The next few bullets summarize some of the findings. 
  • Turns out that the co-editors of Dr. Frank were elderly. This time we got to look at Civil War veterans, including their activity prior to the onset of the major conflict. One example is Col. Thomas W. Higginson who was part of the Secret Six and who helped the western cause related to anti-slavery. The Colonel sent dispatches back to an eastern newspaper; hence, we have this personal view to digest. Then, we have Judge Francis M. Thompson who west as a young man following the path of Lewis & Clark. He wrote of his experiences. The State of Montana, recently, published part of this. The Judge returned to New England where he died. Franklin B. Sanborn left us several views of the times. These three are only part of the writers that Dr. Frank collected to support his magazine. 
  • Sidney Perley, the noted author, retired about the time that the TMM got started. Dr. Frank's sister, Lucie M, picked up his work and published in several issues. As well, she reported on the activities of lineage groups, including The Old Planters Society which used the TMM as its voice. 


Other areas that will get further study deal with early times. For one, information about Samuel Shattuck bears another look. He was the son of Thomas' last wife. As well, Nathaniel Easton is in Dr. Frank's line. We have additional information related to research on him and the events that seem to be one-side-ly celebrated each year. An article written under the auspices of Gardner Research was cited in The American Genealogist.

As a reminder, The Atlantic (Monthly) started in Boston in 1857. It moved to DC recently.  There have always been new magazines starting.

The TMM was only one of several periodicals that started and had its day. Going back to the 1800s, we can look at two that related to our work. The Southern Literary Messenger had an illustrious set of editors, starting with Poe (of the Raven). Its run was from 1834 to 1864. We are interested in that it involves collateral families, is of VA, and had contributors from all over. One article on the Lyceum movement is an example. It was nation wide. New England played a heavy role. But, we see groups formed out in the western areas (which became states), too.

Then, we have a story that is New England to its core. Namely, learning about Count Rumford. Born in New England, he left due to being a Loyalist. Now, he did pioneering in thermodynamics. Actually, as a polymath, he worked in several areas. Did well. Got rich. Then, left monies to Harvard. After the first holder (Bigelow) of the Chair resigned, there was much discussion about the future use of the monies. So, we can look at this from several angles. An interesting twist is that Charles W. Eliot was supposed to get the Chair and did not. He went to Europe. Later, he was head of Harvard. And, made lasting changes.

Remarks:  Modified: 08/09/2017

08/09/2017 --

Friday, August 4, 2017

Samuel Shattuck

In Gardner's Beacon, Vol. III, No. 4, there is a little bit of bio information on Samuel Shattuck who was a step-son of Thomas and son of Thomas' last wife (which wife? we say 2nd, some say 3rd). As the issue reported, Samuel brought back instructions to John Endicott from Charles II for him to quit picking in the Quakers. In doing so, Samuel put himself at risk. Of course, the writ took a long while to take effect. It was too late for Mary Dyer and others. These tales have been told in several places and deserve continued (and periodic) attention.

Recently, Gardner Research had an inquiry about the stated father of Samuel (and husband of Damaris). The issue said Daniel. Was this a supported statement? The first activity was to find the source for this. In preparation for the issue, several publications had been reviewed, including the early one by Lemuel Shattuck and Lydia Hinchman. Too, there were many on-line sites previewed.

We checked the Barney database at Nantucket. The first name was not given. On a quick review of material on the web, there are several suggestion (Samuel, William, Daniel, Daniel Samuel, Samuel William) that do not quote authority.

The error turns out to be not following Dr. Frank who said (100 years ago) that Samuel's father was unknown. That is still the case.

The gist of the article was about Samuel's efforts for the Quakers, plus his experience. Too, that issue continued a time-line for Thomas' children. Why Daniel was picked is anyone's guess.

So, we are putting an entry in our Afterthoughts & Modifications page. Too, we will work on having such additions easily seen.

But, the lesson learned is, if in doubt, don't shout. However, just that brings in a whole lot of discussion, especially with continual changes as we see with technology. Too, though, it gets our attention back to Samuel and his parents.Moriarty mentioned in one of his TAG articles that the relationship between the Shattucks, Popes and Gardners needs a deeper look. We wonder if anyone has attempted that, yet.

Now, having looked at this, there is an open issue from earlier: Wives of George.

Remarks:  Modified: 08/04/2017

08/04/2017 -- 

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Count Rumford

This post continues to look at the periodical that Dr. Frank published, from 1908 to 1918, with his friends and deals with Count Rumford and Charles Crozat Converse.

First, who is Charles? My question, exactly.

Well, in Vol. VII, No. 1 of the Massachusetts Magazine, Charles wrote an article titled "Thompson in Connecticut" which is about an American who became Count Rumford. There is a seat at Harvard by that name. More on that, below.

Back to Charles, first. Godey's Magazine, Vol. 134 (pg 80) had a nice article about Charles. He was a lawyer and a musician with several known hymns. Also, he is written up on Wikipedia. And, some of his ancestry is covered in J. J. Putnam's book on Joseph Convers of Bedford. Also, see C. B. Harvey's Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey (pg 459) for a brief bio. In his TMM article, Charles mentions his family's effort to place a statue of Count Rumford in Boston (it is now in Moburn).

As an aside, Godey published the The Lady's Book from 1830 to 1878. That is a long run. The article on Charles (see above) is quite good.

Benjamin Thompson.jpgNow, to Count Rumford. He was born Benjamin Thompson in 1753 in Woburn, MA. Being a Loyalist, he ended up in Europe and had quite good success. Benjamin was an early thermodynamics researcher: Rumford’s calorific and frigorific radiation. Also, he has wide influence. For the Rumford Medal that is given by the Royal Society, we see a whole lot of illustrious names. For instance, Michael Faraday received the award in 1846.

Benjamin, also, left funds to Harvard for the Rumford chair that was first held by Jacob Bigelow. When Jacob resigned, Benjamin Peirce (father of Charles Sanders Peirce - more on this later due to some interesting connections) got involved as a replacement was considered. Eventually, Benjamin Peirce got the Rumford chair rolled into the new ‘practical’ school (Science at Harvard University) related to science and engineering (that is, getting away from counting angels on a pin head). There is a lot to know about Benjamin Thompson (The Life and Legend of Count Rumford).

---

Commercial site with links to information about Count Rumford.

Remarks: Modified: 08/03/2017

08/03/2017 -- Turns out that Benjamin's money gives us a chance to look at Harvard, its history, it roles, and its dreams (hopefully, more than exultation on endowment size). The platform? Quora: What is the coolest obscure history fact you know?

Another side of the story, Charles W. Eliot was supposed to get the Rumford chair in 1863. It went to Wolcott Gibbs.

Saturday, July 8, 2017

Kansas and Lawrence

Kansas was a project of New England. Lawrence, in particular, got special attention. In Robinson Park in Douglas County, there is a plaque that commemorates those families who were involved. Some of these came as pioneers. Some came to help and went back.

Plaque, Robinson Park, Lawrence KS
The plaque contains the names of those in the first two parties. Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson came in two years later with more supporters under the auspices of The National Kansas Committee.

1854 was the year of first arrival. Rev. Cordley covered this in his History (Final migration). Two years later, Col. Thomas Wentworth Higginson came in with more supporters (Reinforcements).

Those on the Oregon Trail went right below Mt. Oread for twenty years, before this migration started, after they left Gardner Junction (map) having split with the folks headed to Santa Fe. There was continuing use of the Oregon Trail for a couple decades after this event.

In 1943, Louise Barry wrote 'The Emigrant Aid Company Parties' which is available at the site of the Kansas Historical Society. In her article, she provides some details about each individual.

The next issue of The Gardner Annals will have more information about The National Kansas Committee.

Views on the National Kansas Committee: Eli ThayerThaddeus Hyatt, Kansas Historical Society, Col. TW Higginson, FB Sanborn, Kansas Memory, KU in LK, Master's Thesis 1923 (Relief Work in Kansas), ...

Remarks: Modified: 08/13/2017

07/23/2017 -- For those in Louise Barry's article, we need to update their information. The Thomas Gardner Society will be looking at those who were involved with The Massachusetts Magazine plus other information related to our interest. 

08/13/2017 -- Posts on Lawrence (and surrounds): Trails WestWestward HoBlogging and suchFinal MigrationThomas Wentworth HigginsonKansas and Lawrence.

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Gardner's Beacon, Vol VII, No 1

This issue of Gardner's Beacon reports on several research activities of the last six months. These will be covered in more detail the next issue of The Gardner Annals (to be published later in 2017).
Vol. VII, No. 1
  • The Old Planters Society - At the first meeting in 1899, Col. Thomas W. Higginson gave an introduction about the motivation which had been summarized by the organizing committee. 
  • The Massachusetts Magazine - The TMM ran from 1908 to 1918. All issues have been digitized. The Gardner Annals provided Table of Contents for the first five Volumes in the issue of December of 2016. In the next issue, the remaining Table of Contents will be covered. 
  • TMM - Contributors - As well, there will be commentary on authors and articles. First up are F.B. Sanborn, Col. Thomas W. Higginson, and Judge Francis M. Thompson. These three were of the 19th century and had remarkable careers. Col. Higginson supported John Brown, brought help to the Territory of Kansas in its pre-Civil War struggles, and led the first colored regiment during the Civil War. He also was a correspondent for The Atlantic and a regularly interchanged mail with Emily Dickinson. Of course, Dr. Frank was central to the theme. His sister, Lucie, reported on meetings of family associations and carried forward work of Sidney Perley.  
Additionally, there is reference to the new URL, namely TGSoc.org. At this site, we will adapt a new format. While this activity is in process, the old site will be considered heritage (archival). Plus the new site will be the mail handler for the organization (contact - algswtlk@TGSoc.org). And, this year, we will print the first two volumes of The Gardner Annals with the first three volumes of Gardner's Beacon. We will announce when these are ready to be purchased.

---

See Vol. VII, No. 1 of Gardner's Beacon for a review of research to date.

Remarks: Modified: 07/03/2017

07/03/2017 -- Forgot to mention Rev. John Wise in the above writeup.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Gardner Research citation

Until a few days ago, we thought that we were the only defenders of Nathaniel Eaton. Along that line, we, recently, did a post on Nathaniel Eaton and noted his academic accomplishments which were substantial. Yet, he is vilified via Harvard's view related to tales told. Or, so it seems to go. Too, notice that we remark, in the post, about Dr. Frank's ignoring this subject.

Then, very recently, we were contacted by David Danielson Eaton who is a descendant of Nathaniel and is member of The Eaton Families Association (EFA). This group has been at it since 1884 and so will be of interest. Too, they have a connection with descendants of Theophilus Eaton. He was the brother of Nathaniel. We got an update to Nathaniel's Wikipedia page.

As an aside, as the Gardner Research article (next) was being prepared, the Eaton group was writing about Nathaniel (newsletters for members only). We have a copy of an article published by the EFA in defense of Nathaniel (Barbara Fitzsenry The 'New' Etonian (June 2015) "A Discussion of Nathaniel Eaton's Reputation as Seen by History").

This article was not seen prior to the Gardner Research article about Dr. Frank being a descendant: TGA Vol. II, No. I "Benjamin Brown Gardner (and Nathaniel Eaton)" which was published too in TEG 35:1. In our article, we commented that Nathaniel's experience at Harvard needs another look; there have been many posts alluding to this theme.

In a coming TGA, we will reprint parts of the EFA paper. Too, though, we learned that the Gardner Research article had been referenced in an Eaton article in The American Genealogist (see image).


As an aside, many early writers noted that Anna, the daughter of Benoni who was a son of Nathaniel, died young. But, we referenced the notion of H.H. Crapo and the Knapp family that Anna married and had offspring. Too, we have this excerpt from a New Haven meeting in which Anna's information is corrected in pencil: The family of Nathaniel Eaton (at the Boston Library, available via archive.org).

No doubt, there is a lot to the stories and their provenances. But, it will be good to have Nathaniel get another hearing. Expect this theme to be continued in the near future.

One motivation. This may have been an early witch hunt. Dr. Frank's ancestors can tell us of that. As well, the whole theme applies to today (various ways). To us, it is another example of New England's long reach.

Remarks: Modified: 08/09/2017 

08/03/2017 -- What is the coolest obscure history fact you know? This question, on Quora, seemed a good place to present some of research findings. Nathaniel's experience is first, since the answer deals with Harvard and its roles. Not to condone bad behavior, however we need to look at this from Nathaniel's side, too. He was highly educated before coming over here. He met up with uncouth youth of the colonies. Now, here is an issue. Do you realize how Captains on ships treated their measly sailors? Not well. One might say torture. Too, slavery has been the norm for mankind for a very long time, Seems to sit well with some cultures, even today, that is, misbehavior there on the part of slavers, of several type. Incidentally, look at now the Puritans handled their misfits. Say, Quakers? The look from now to then, seemingly celebrated each year at the esteemed institution, is (has been) one-sided.

08/09/2017 -- In the School of Tyrannus (2014). Left this comment (Some of the 'apologies' (see latest updates on the Wikipedia page for Nathaniel) may have come from descendants (via Benoni who was left in Cambridge). Over the years, several have researched the matter which, to me (an outsider, and in-law, and johnny-come-lately), does need another look. See thomasgardnerofsalem for an overview.) on the page. There needs to be an engaged discourse.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

Judge Francis M. Thompson

Next up is Judge Francis M. Thompson of Greenfield, MA. This post continues our review of editors and contributors to The Massachusetts Magazine (started by Dr. Frank). Earlier, we looked at R.A. Douglas-Litghow, MD, LLDF. B. Sanborn, and Thomas Wentworth Higginson (Thomas brought troops and supplies to Kansas in 1854 from New England, among other things).

Among other accomplishments, Francis was author of The History of Greenfield (Vol I - google.com, Vol II - archive.org). We will look at that.

For now, we want to list the articles published in the TMM, in order of their appearance. Both Thomas and Francis were out west prior to the Civil War. Francis spent more time and was a pioneer in Montana. So, there is a lot to cover.

The articles were titled "Reminiscences of Four-Score Years" and started to appear with Volume V.
We will go through these in more detail as they pertain to the westward expansion. The Montana Historical Society Press published Francis' story (2004): A Tenderfoot in Montana. The reprint mentions that the text came out of The Massachusetts Magazine.



Remarks: Modified: 08/03/2017 

06/17/2017 --

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Thomas Wentworth Higginson

We admit being late in writing about Thomas Wentworth Higginson. He was a contributor to, and editor of, the Massachusetts Magazine. Earlier, we looked at R.A. Douglas-Litghow, MD, LLD and F. B. Sanborn.

Today, I saw that several authors, including F.B. and Dr. Frank, had written about Thomas after he died (TMM, Vol. IV (1911), No. 3, pg 139). F.B. noted that he had corresponded with Thomas in regard to a topic that we addressed earlier (Final migration), in a different context. We quoted Cordley's book about the early efforts to found Lawrence, KS. There have been several posts about the long reach of New England into the western part of the country.

F.B. gives us a deeper look at the activity of Thomas in this regard. He helped form the State Kansas Committee. He was an active abolitionist. One motivation was the Charles Sumner attack. Charles was beaten in the Senate by a Southern Representative (1856). Too, Thomas, personally, knew, and admired, John Brown (more on that later). And, events in bleeding Kansas had gotten more violent.

There were several names for the Committee, such as The National Kansas Committee, as reported by The National Magazine, in Vol.17 (1893). Wikipedia does not have a page for this activity which is an oversight to be fixed.

Related material at Territorial Kansas On-line.

Thomas printed his notes and letters (in the New York Tribune) from his 1856 visit to Kanzas. Thomas stopped in several towns and wrote a lot of Lawrence. He gives us a view of the area just prior to the Civil War which ensued, largely, from those events out west.

We will look at all aspects of Thomas' life. He is a descendant of Thomas Gardner of Salem. Thomas was also first President of The Old Planters Society.

Several of the TMM authors had ventured west. For instance, Judge Francis M. Thompson, of Greenfield, MA, toured the west following Lewis and Clark. Too, he was a pioneer of Montana.

Remarks: Modified: 08/12/2017 

06/15/2017 -- Thomas donated his files related to Kansas to the Kansas Historical Society. Story of His Life (1914) by Mary Potter Thacher Higginson. "Kansas and John Brown" from The Writings of Thomas Wentworth Higginson.

07/11/2017 -- In 1929, a plague was put in a park in Lawrence, KS. It lists the names of the members of the first two parties. Thomas W. Higginson arrive two years later.

07/12/2017 -- Sanborn and Higginson were in the Secret Six.

08/13/2017 -- Posts on Lawrence (and surrounds): Trails WestWestward HoBlogging and suchFinal MigrationThomas Wentworth HigginsonKansas and Lawrence.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Sidney at his best

Perley, of course. While working on the next issue of The Gardner Annals, I am looking at The Massachusetts Magazine, The Essex Antiquarian, and others. Too, we are looking at how Lucie M. Gardner picked up Sidney's work.

But, this little article on chimney sweeping got my attention. That, folks, was England and New England.

Please read the article. No need to say anything more.

Remarks: Modified: 06/14/2017 

06/14/2017 -- Sidney's periodical is available for ready at Hathi Trust: The Essex antiquarian : an illustrated ... magazine devoted to the biography, genealogy, history and antiquities of Essex County, Massachusetts. 

Sidney last published Oct 1909. The next issue of The Massachusetts Magazine had the first continuation by Lucie.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Franklin Benjamin Sanborn

Earlier, we looked at an author that helped Dr. Frank with his magazine, namely R.A. Douglas-Litghow, MD, LLD. RA was quite prolific.

There are many more, but let's look at F.B. Sanborn (updated the Wiki page with a pointer to the Massachusetts Magazine) who popped up as we were looking at, and digging into, the minutes of The Old Planters Society of Salem. In 1916, F.B. gave a talk about Hector St. John, calling him an evasive planter. The story is interesting.
It is interesting that Hector was the namesake of St. Johnsbury, VT through his friend, Ethan Allen.

There will be more in the upcoming issue of The Gardner Annals.

Too, we will bring forward all of the Old Planter Society minutes that we can find.

Remarks: Modified: 08/12/2017 

06/14/2017 -- F.B. corresponded with Thomas Wentworth Higginson.

07/12/2017 -- The Significance of Being Frank. ... Sanborn and Higginson were in the Secret Six.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

The Old Planters Society

Thomas Wentworth Higginson was the first President of The Old Planters Society (TOPS) that instituted in 1899. Frank A. Gardner, M.D. was Vice-President. The members list consists of illustrious descendants of the early colonists (see below).

The following documents are found at archive.org.
In the pamphlet, published June 19, 1900, there is an overview of the society (page 11) and its motivations. We have seen this mentioned elsewhere, but one purpose was educational. And, one focus was to get those here before 1630 included in historical looks, excluding the "Mayflower people." 

The Thomas Gardner Society, Inc. agrees with this view and will carry this forward using The Gardner Annals. The issue for Vol. IV, No. 1 is in preparation.  


In that same section, we find the reading list of the Society. These are on our bibliography, but we will be looking at them again. 


Finally, the pamphlet starts out with a talk by Col. Higginson. It was titled "The Alliance between Pilgrim and Puritan in Massachusetts." The TOPS published many talks which we will document. 

Of note, briefly, though, is that in 1900, Col. Higginson was 77 years of age. Many other members were elderly.

Dr. Frank and his sister were much younger. Too, later, Lucie M. Gardner was Secretary of the TOPS. TOPS published via The Massachusetts Magazine (started printing in 1908) while it was published. Lucie edited a section that was titled "Pilgrims and Planters" that reported on meetings of the TOPS, offered commentary, and gave notice of the activity of other organizations, such as the Balch Family Association and The Gardner Family Association. The TMM ceased publishing in 1918. 

--

Earlier, we wrote of this group in a post (December 2012): Old Planters, Massachusetts. A corresponding post covered another group (May 2011): Old Planters, Beverly.  

Remarks: Modified: 06/14/2017 

06/14/2017 -- Thomas Wentworth Higginson and Bleeding Kansas. The Massachusetts Magazine (Vol. II, No. 2, pg 117)  reported that it was an official arm of the Old Planters Society.


Thursday, May 25, 2017

Lucie following Sidney

Lucie? Dr. Frank's sister, Lucie M. Gardner.

Sidney? Need you ask? Sidney Perley, the long-time editor of the Essex Antiquarian. He published the magazine from 1897 to 1909.

We are working on the next issue of The Gardner Annals. Last time, we looked at the Table of Contents for Volumes I through V of The Massachusetts Magazine (TMM). Also, we featured a bit about R.A. Douglas-Lithgow who provided several articles to Dr. Frank's effort.

This time, we will look at the Table of Contents for Volumes VI through XI. We also will feature a few things from those times.

After that, we will bring out lots of topics, especially those that are apropos to today.

This image is from Vol II. Sidney quit publishing. He mentioned Dr. Frank's periodical. Lucie picked up and published several articles on "Family Genealogies."


Anyone wishing contribute an article, please contact us at jmswtlk@tgsoc.org. 

What I have seen by looking thoroughly at Volumes I through V is that the initial thrust with many authors settles into a few authors providing the material (while working like mad). Several factors went into the demise of TMM. One had to do with the age of the authors. Then, WWI came along. We will show a graphic from a survey done in 1914. 

Remarks: Modified: 06/14/2017 

06/14/2017 -- Sidney last published Oct 1909. The next issue of The Massachusetts Magazine had the first continuation by Lucie.

Friday, May 5, 2017

Lyceum

On this day in 1857, some folks in Boston got together to start a magazine. It was named after the great pond twixt here and the old country. And, it is still publishing (from DC having moved there from Boston in 2006). And so, we continue our interests in old magazines. As well as looking at The Massachusetts Magazine, we will consider several that were prior.

However, while looking at one of the authors of the Southern Literary Messenger, namely Lydia Sigourney, we came across the story of the Lyceum movement that started in New England as a response to efforts in Britain and the Continent. After the New England start, it rolled across the country. Lydia, of New England of course, inspired several local Lyceum chapters in several western states. We will be getting back to her.

In the meantime, that educational movement seems to have some applicability to our current state of affairs. Notice this from the history by Anna L. Curtis (in 1906): ... for the coronation of this plain common sense of the people, and for the annunciation and for the defense of fact, of truth, of reality, of actual human experience.

Now, does that not sound like New England? And, ought not it apply to today's muddy cloud of social media?

We will be doing a series on these old articles, especially those that relate to the themes of New England's broad reach across the country.

Who said that we cannot learn from the past? Rather, we ought to ask, anything new under the sun?

Remarks: Modified: 05/05/2017 

05/05/2017 --

Magazines

We are going through The Massachusetts Magazine (TMM) in order to document the effort by Dr. Frank and friends. The TMM published from 1908 to 1918. When we first were researching the TMM, we encountered The New England Magazine (1886-1900) which had started as the Bay State (1884-1885, 1886-1887) monthly (edited by John McClintock who was a contributing editor for the TMM).

Then, we ran across the Southern Literary Messenger, that published from 1834 to 1864, while researching southern families with New England ties. An early editor was Edgar Allen Poe. We will look at this further as we make comparison between the periodicals.

Today, there was a message sent to all interested by Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic. It started publishing in 1857 and is still going strong. We have to be interested in that the magazine started in Boston and was there until just a few years ago when it moved to D.C.

Message:
    On May 5, 1857, a group of Boston Brahmins gathered for dinner at the Parker House Hotel and decided to create a new magazine, one that would make politics, literature, and the arts its chief concerns. These men, united in their opposition to slavery, their love of American writing, and their tripartite names, included such eminences as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and James Russell Lowell. They did not set out to exclude women from the gathering; Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, was invited, but she boycotted the dinner when she learned that alcohol would be served.
    A plan for this new magazine was set. The question of a name soon arose. Oliver Wendell Holmes, another of the founders, proposed "The Atlantic," to convey the notion that an immense ocean would separate this New World journal from its cousins in the Old. A manifesto was written, one that made ambitious promises: In politics, The Atlantic would be "the organ of no party or clique, but will honestly endeavor to be the exponent of what its conductors believe to be the American idea," and it would bring to the attention of the reading public the newest and most interesting American writers. The manifesto was signed by, among others, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and yes, "Mrs. H. Beecher Stowe."
    In November of 1857, the first issue of this magazine was published, and we have never stopped publishing. And since its founding, this magazine has published everyone from the aforementioned Hawthorne (who served as the magazine's Civil War correspondent) to Frederick Douglass and Walt Whitman; from Robert Frost and Helen Keller to W. E. B. Du Bois and Booker T. Washington; from Emily Dickinson and Virginia Woolf to Mark Twain and Ernest Hemingway and Sylvia Plath, to a raft of future presidents—Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson and JFK—and on to the great writers of today, too many to even begin mentioning.
    We know that the America of today would be unrecognizable to the founders of this magazine, but my hope is that they would take quickly to today's Atlantic. They would recognize in our journalism the stringent application of intelligence and analytic rigor to the great problems of the day; the devotion to the explication of not only the American idea, but also the nature of an unsettled world; and a great love of literature and culture in all of its manifestations—"the whole domain of aesthetics," in the words of the founding manifesto. I believe that the founders would be able to locate these values in our print magazine, on our website, at our events, and in our documentaries. (I also believe that they would be confused by our Instagram account.)
    Today, on the 160th anniversary of the conception of The Atlantic, I write to thank you, our subscribers, for your support, and your devotion across the years.
Magazine? One can think of these as condensed views from a particular time. They go beyond journalism. And, in the future, these will be condensations of the ever-flowing web material. As such, they are important to history; and, there are those with genealogy as subject (NEHGR, for example - published since 1847).

Remarks: Modified: 05/05/2017 

05/05/2017 --

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Essex Institute, Historical Collections

Research continues to learn more of the origins of Thomas and Margaret. This post looks at one of these sources that dates to the middle of the 1800s.

Vol. I
So far, in terms of earlier writers, we have heard from Rev Hubbard (his manuscript is from the 1680s), Joseph B. FeltJohn Farmer, James Savage, George D. Phippen (more below), Benjamin Peirce, and more. Then, later in the 1900s, we have Dr. Frank who published via Salem Press and Anderson of the Great Migration effort.

Phippen's first article appeared in Volume I of the Historical Collections of the Essex Institute. The Historical Collections published until 1993. There is an index available at Hathi Trust. One can view the full index on-line through 1922.

As we look at The Massachusetts Magazine, we will compare articles with what is in the Historical Collections. Dr. Frank had material printed there, too.

Excerpts from Phippen's talk
The first part of Phippen's article was read at the Essex Institute on March 25, 1858. There were two more sessions, all of which appeared in Volume I. The title of his talk was: The "Old Planters" of Salem, who were settled here before the arrival of Governor Endicott, in 1628. In the first part, Phippen talks about the general topic of the times, earlier plantations, and the Cape Ann effort. He mentions the great house, put up by Thomas in the first year, which was moved to Salem (my take on the story).

Then, Phippen lists the names of fifteen figures. Thomas Gardner is included (#11). Conant, Lyford, Woodbury, and Balch head the list. One wonders why Lyford is mentioned so prominently (he fled).

In the second part, Phippen writes of the planters, starting with Roger Conant. He gets through John Balch. In the third part, he does the rest. See about Thomas Gardner, on page 190. Phippen writes that the Thomas who was the son of Thomas was the husband of Margaret and Damaris. Also, he mentions that there was a George Gardner who was the brother of the older Thomas.

That last has to do with something needing a little attention. Savage wrote of six Thomas Gardners. Two families, with father, son and grandson. One was Salem, the other Roxbury. For Salem, he has the son being the father of the children that we know. For Roxbury, the elder Thomas died here in 1638.

But, Dr. Frank, in his book, said that he saw no evidence of this. However, research at Dorcester has Thomas (the elder) coming over and going back. He died in England in 1633.

So, it's curious. What we need to do is gather and organize, Then,we can try to fill in the pieces. In any case, conjectures abound.

Remarks: Modified: 04/26/2017 

04/26/2017 --






 







Wednesday, April 5, 2017

Review, overview

We're a little late getting to looking at the year's close (2016) due to some need to look at technology and its issues. That theme is getting more complicated than not. So, it'll be a recurrent affair.

So, with the end of a quarter in 2017, it seemed appropriate to catch up. Namely, looking to the next issue of The Gardner Annals brings up the need to get a little cohesion going. And so, the review of what is there motivates an overview. This is not an outline, rather a little patter on the matter.

Per usual, we would like to request submissions. Actually, an ahnentafel starting about 1900 would be nice if it were to be accompanied with some story. Lord knows, there are all sorts of tales that remain to be told. The only stipulation for an issue of the TGA would be having sources. But, they do not need to be included.

An example is the "Flyover country" article from last time that looked at Mayflower descendant buried in a lonely grave out in the prairies of Nebraska. We also had a post about that: Flyover country. This person was also a descendant of John Porter of Salem. Porters and Gardners intermarried, so there is a link back to Thomas, too. However, even if not, we all need to be aware of the western migration and of those who ventured away from the east coast. In short, there is a whole lot to that vast middle of the country.

The article in the TGA referenced documents without quoting them. That could come with a later article that gives the specifics. We also want to do those. For now, consider some reasonable format. Here is an example: Benjamin Brown Gardner. He is the grandfather of Dr. Frank. Benjamin's wife, Lucy, had an interesting pedigree, too (poor dears, Wardwell and Parker).

On Salem and witches. You know, I don't know if the descendants get the proper condolences what with the commercialization that has become associated with the ordeal. But, we'll tell some of the tales. BTW, two Porter men married Hathorne women. One couple is ancestor of the one of the lonely grave. The other couple is ancestor of Dr. Frank.

As a cursory look, here are some items being worked that are amenable to TGA inclusion.
    We will be doing a brief look at the contents (and the ToC) of Volumes VI through XI of The Massachusetts Magazine. Not only did Dr. Frank do his military monographs (I saw one of these cited, recently), his sister, Lucie, published several genealogies of New England families.

    Then, Dr. Frank and other illustrious ones started the Old Planters Society in 1899. We'll look at their corporate documents. Some of the talks to this Society were printed in the TMM.

    After Dr. Frank did his 1907 book, there were meetings, for several years, of the Gardner Family Association. We'll look at that.

    Too, there will be something on some of New England's early contribution to that which the Philly guys did (which is celebrated every year). As in, New England wrought this. Of course, Rev. John Wise will be mentioned. His wife was a descendant of Thomas Gardner of Roxbury. 
I'm looking for another way to say "Philly guys." Any suggestions? You see, discussions seem to start with that set of events. Too, they are associated with fireworks. So, they stick in the mind. Yet, there were all sorts of things that led to those ones and their minds.

Remarks: Modified: 06/24/2017 

04/05/2017 -- 

Friday, March 31, 2017

The Hebraist

In his 1907 book, Dr. Frank filled in part of Samuel's tree down to his parent's generation; the 1933 book expanded upon the descendants of George (see comparison of persons in the 1907 and 1933 books). At each generation in his line, he briefly mentioned some of the colonial ancestors of the wives.

Here is an example showing Abel who was the great-grandson of Thomas through Samuel and Abel's son. Abel married Priscilla Stacey. Dr. Frank mentions some names, such as Rev. William Worcester.
Now, when he gets to Abel's son, Simon Stacey Gardner, he only mentions the parents of Rebecca Knapp. Now, her father, Nathaniel Knapp, was of Newbury and has a diary published related to his experience in the Second Siege of Louisburg (Nathaniel's Diary, Wikipedia). Given that Dr. Frank did a series of monographs on the Revolutionary effort in Massachusetts, one wonders why he didn't look further at Rebecca's pedigree. I certainly did, as a newcomer to all of this. Dr. Frank, himself, mentions that the 1758 events were considered a training ground, somewhat. As in, the King's troops learned what they needed to get free.

I am sure that Dr. Frank did look at this part of his history. He could have been mentioned some names, many from the Newbury area. But, he wished to ignore one. Who? On a closer look, we see Nathaniel Eaton. Nathaniel Knapp was a grandson of Benoni Eaton, son of Nathaniel. Benoni had been raised in Cambridge after his family had left. We discussed Nathaniel Eaton earlier when we filled in the ahnentafel for Dr. Frank's grandfather, Benjamin Brown Gardner (TGA Vol II, No 1 - May 2015).

So, given the time of Dr. Frank, who would have wanted to mention Nathaniel Eaton? Well, we will, now. A post (Benjamin Brown Gardner) from that time provides a little information about Nathaniel. After his Harvard ordeal, Nathaniel was in VA for a while. Then, he was at Padua and got two more degrees (MD, PhD).

And, so given that Nathaniel is yearly on the hook (one-sided affair), perhaps, we can re-look at the whole thing and tell the tale properly. It is interesting that in the Wikipedia article, there is some allusion to Nathaniel, perhaps, enduring an early witch hunt.

This time, the study will be done by a descendant. All sorts of viewpoints have been expressed over the years. Below, there are pointers to recent material provided mainly as an example. In doing a brief search, I have found that the subject has been much debated over the years. So, we will be collecting these thoughts and writings.
    Williams, G.H. (2014) - Divinings: Religion at Harvard, ... - evidently Nathaniel was on the same boat as John Harvard. Nathaniel's brother, Theophilus, and friends fled south and were founders of New Haven, CT. ... Nathaniel was no slouch (he studied under William Ames at Franeker).

    Celebrate Boston - quotes Dutch visitor to Harvard. "We found there," our Dutchman reports, "eight or ten young fellows sitting around smoking tobacco, with the smoke of which the room was so full, that you could hardly see, and the whole house smelt so strong of it, that when I was going up stairs, I said this is certainly a tavern . . . We inquired how many professors there were, and they replied not one, as there was no money to support one. We asked how many students there were. They said, at first, thirty, and then came down to twenty: I afterwards understood there were probably not ten. They could hardly speak a word of Latin, so that my comrade could not converse with them." Why mention this? Nathaniel, evidently, had some runup against youth who may have been rebellious (much discussion will arise here); a question to explore is this, was Harvard the first true experience of the ensuing sense of freedom that is only the privilege of the 1% (or less)? Of course, the Dutch visitor was much later (1680); yet, given the scene, one has to wonder (say, my query asking a comparison - John Gardner and the Merrimack River).

    Love it or loathe it: It's Harvard's birthday - mentions Eaton and the early years. Too, puts things into perspective.
Aside: Look on the Talk page of the Wikipedia article (find JMSwtlk) for recent entries, such as students complaining about having to eat the same food as did Nathaniel's Moor.

Last year's research also brought up another character that needs another look. Namely, Sir Christopher Gardner. There are conflicting viewpoints. Gardner Research wants to help set the record straight, or to as close as may be done at this late date.

Remarks: Modified: 06/24/2017 

04/04/2017 -- The topic of late? Bro' culture of Silly Valley. Plus, frat house thinking. Was this an American phenomenon? If so, Harvard got it started early. Imagine. Someone with a PhD level educational experience being short-tempered with brats. Ah, do we not see that every day? But, to think, nothing new under the sun. And, America's roles are sorely in need of further analysis. BTW, I was in the U.S. Army as a 17-year-old, hence my particular characterizations of the matter. We really need a draft and some type of national service. How else can a proper understanding get a basis (that is, what is 'America' and why?)?

06/19/2017 -- There has been a lot of Eaton family research. Hopefully, we can get Nathaniel another look or two. From such, what will ensue?

Monday, March 13, 2017

Thomas Gardner of Roxbury

There are always questions coming up with respect to "all things Gardner." Dr. Frank summarized what he knew about colonial Gardner families in both versions of his book. See image from the 1933 edition: Gardners and Gardners.

This post is about part of the family of Thomas of Roxbury. One of his sons-in-law is the Rev. John Wise. In this post, we will pull together a few things related to Rev. John in order to set the stage for further discussion.

But, first, let's look at his grandmother, Alice Freeman. This graphic (adaptation from Chris Chester's site on Alice Freeman) shows how she relates, as well, to some descendants of Thomas of Salem.

Alice was coined uber-mother by Gary Boyd Roberts of the NEHGS. Her daughters are the forebears of many prominent New England families. Too, Alice is from an ancient Anglo-Saxon line. So, we will be looking at that further.

One purpose for the image is to show the timeline that ends near the middle of the 20th century. Since then,we have several more generations at hand. What is coming up will be the 400th of those first entrants and their lives. You know, the 300th needs some attention, as effects from the War of 1812 were wide-spread (see Gardner-Pingree House).

Now, Rev. John, who was from Ipswich in MA, was called one of the inspirations for the Declaration of Independence (DoI), by President Calvin Coolidge. In the Stories from Ipswich blog, there was some discussion about the motivation for the comment. This image provides a snap of the post showing words from Rev. John and the DoI.


Given the times, we see a lot of interest in the subject. An example is the musical, Hamilton. Alexander is of the Philly crowd (see How powerful is the U.S. Constitution?). But, lots happened before then to set the stage.

As Dr. Frank mentioned in his series of monographs related to the Boston Massacre, many at that event had trained militarily and served under the King (see Regimental History Series).

Now, Rev. John is of interest due to his being both a Harvard graduate and a working man. That is, the Rev. put his muscles to work (those other than the brain). Of course, at the same time, there were clergy who only diddled in religous issues. Too, we had lawyers. But, somehow, the lessons from Rev. John have been lost on the populace. He was no pretend Lord of the realm.

Remarks: Modified: 07/03/2017 

07/03/2017 -- We mention Rev. John in the summer issue of Gardner's Beacon.

Friday, February 24, 2017

U.S. and us

Research continues. There is a lot to do as the scope keeps expanding. Part of this is due to just becoming aware of what was there and to the queries about things Gardner.

As well, I am looking further into Nathaniel Eaton. His experience can stand as the dart board for a whole lot of discussion; and, this bit of debate would be apropos to our times. Pending is a further look at Sir Christopher Gardner. The tales that are commonly told are both off the target and incomplete. So, we will weigh in there. Seems that there might be a relationship with Thomas. We'll see.

Mentioning Eaton. He came up since Harvard has lots of appeal and gets a lot of attention. As it ought. Why? It comes out of the New England experience. And, despite some arguments otherwise, those times of 400 years ago have meaning for us now.

And, getting to Harvard, we will be looking at one early graduate (pre-1700). He was said to be an inspiration for the Declaration of Independence. Now, the Philly crowd (my characterization) gets a lot of attention. Genius, we hear. And, the Constitution. Stands as God-given, does it not? However, those later guys relied upon work done prior to their time. I have a little better grasp of that now having looked at parallels twixt the Massachusetts (and its surrounds) and Virginia (and its surrounds) experiences. Some were in both places, such as our friend, Nathaniel.

About the inspirational guy, as said by Sibley, Calvin Coolidge, and others. Sibley said that they republished this guy's books in 1772 as debate fired up. We are talking Rev. John Wise from that interesting place called Ipswich. We will get more into that.
John's wife was the daughter of Thomas Gardner of Roxbury. So, as this chart shows, there was a merger of the two Gardner families just before the U. S. Civil War.

Chris Chester (Descendants of Alice Freeman) has an interesting site. He decided to document descendants of Alice. We were happy that we could add information about daughter, Mary, who was the oldest. BTW, the Hodgkins is kin of the Colonel featured by David McCullough in his look at 1776.

Now, John is also noted for being jailed during the tax turmoil in the 1680s. That is, he led the first tea party, so to speak. Dudley had these guys fined. The Governor had them jailed. Later, John sued Dudley and won; the claim: not allowing rights of habeas corpus. 

So, "all things Gardner" covers a lot of territory. 

Remarks: Modified: 02/24/2017 

02/24/2017 --

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

TMM, a review

In the last issue, the TGA (list of issues) provided the Table of Contents for Vol. I through Vol. V. of The Massachusetts Magazine (see The Gardner Annals, Vol. III, No. 1 - pg 13). Next issue will provide an overview of the remaining years.

Then, we will look at specific articles, such as this one (Regimental History Series, background and motivation) by Dr. Frank. The TMM had articles by several prominent authors, such as RA Douglas-Lithgow, MD, LLD.

As an aside, we now have the internet, cloud, and social media (categorization is still needed). In the early days, one printed. That is, after the press was made generally available. Many magazines have come into existence and died out since the time of entry that is celebrated by those who have New England old-time blood. The TMM was the second try with this name. The first even had the interest of old Ben, himself, as in Franklin.

Remarks: Modified: 04/23/2017 

04/23/2017 -- The Gardner Annals, Vol. III, No. 1 provided the Table of Contents for the first five volumes of The Massachusetts Magazine.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

DNA, again

Related posts: DNA and genealogy, Genome and more.

For now, a list:
Remarks: Modified: 07/11/2017 

01/18/2017 -- This will be discussed in the context of nature and nurture. After all, there is a whole traditional collection, albeit more arguable given social media, that bears some attention.